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Significant Aspects for Missouri FFA and 4-H Poultry Judging

(sub-set of modifications approved by National Poultry Extension Specialist committee, 11/98)

(Preliminary 3/2//00 in revision JJL & C. Webb)

Please report comments and suggestions:

E-MAIL LyonsJ@missouri.edu

There are some differences in the State and National and between the 4-H and FFA Events. State winners will need to review these differences as the team prepares for the National Event.

The State FFA and 4-H Event, classes and resources are discussed in the following sections:

  1. Past egg production
  2. Oral reasons for hens (past egg production) or pullets (potential egg production)
  3. Grading Ready-to-cook chicken carcasses or parts
  4. Identification of chicken carcass parts
  5. Interior egg quality: candled eggs
  6. Interior egg quality: broken-out eggs (4-H)
  7. Carton eggs written factors and placing (FFA, Year 2000 only)
  8. Placing Ready-to-Cook turkey or broiler carcasses (FFA)
  9. Evaluating Precooked, Breaded Chicken Patties (FFA National)
  10. Exterior Egg Quality
  11. Exterior Egg Quality Grades
  12. Oral reasons Ready to Cook Turkey or Broiler carcasses (FFA)
  13. Written Management Exam (FFA)
  1. Past egg production  Each class will consist of four live White Leghorn hens. The Hormel computing slide for scoring judging events will be used to determine the scores of the placing. In this system, points will be deducted for each incorrect pair depending on the difficulty of placing that pair. The deductions are normally from 2 to 10 points for each incorrect pair. If more than one placing is checked on the card, the lowest score possible for the class is given. If no placing is checked on the card, zero is given.
  2. Oral reasons for past egg production  Oral reasons will be presented on one class of past egg production White Leghorn hens. The score will be based on appearance (24%), proper use of terms (20%), accuracy of statements (20%) and completeness of coverage (36%). Detailed information will be supplied to those counties responding to the annual announcement of the event, and upon request.
  3. Grading Ready-to-cook chickens  The class will be composed of ten 2.5 to 4.0 pound chicken carcasses. Each bird will be graded A, B or C. Two points will be deducted for each grade separation line crossed. Five points will be deducted if a contestant fails to enter a grade for a bird, or enters more than one grade for a bird.
  4. Identification of chicken carcass parts  Ten chicken parts will be identified. For each part, a 10 point deduction will be made for an incorrect identification.
  5. Interior egg quality: candled eggs  Twenty white eggs will be graded AA, A, B or Inedible based on candling. One point will be deducted for each grade separation line crossed, except when the line between "]3" grade and "Inedible" is crossed; then three points will be deducted. Five points will be deducted if a contestant fails to enter a grade for an egg, or enters more than one grade for the same egg.
  6. Interior egg quality: broken-out eggs Ten broken-out eggs will be graded AA, A, B or Inedible based on appearance. Three points will be deducted for each grade separation line crossed, except when the line between "B" grade and "Inedible" is crossed; then four points will be deducted. Ten points will be deducted if a contestant fails to enter a grade for an egg, or enters more than one grade for the same egg.
  7. Exterior egg quality.  Twenty white eggs will be graded A, B or Dirty based on appearance. Two points will be deducted when the separation line between grade "A" and "B" is crossed. When the line between "B" grade and "Dirty" is crossed, three points will be deducted. Five points will be deducted if a contestant fails to enter a grade for an egg, or enters more than one grade for the same egg.

A. Past Egg Production


Objective:

To rank four live White Leghorn hens according to the number of eggs they have laid before the event.

Guidelines:

If a pair of hens has equal loss of pigment, then use handling qualities to decide which hen is best. The better the handling quality, the better the hen. A lean, trim condition of the pubic bones, skin and abdomen means good handling quality.

If a pair of hens has equal loss of pigment and equal handling quality, then use abdominal capacity to decide which hen is best. A wide distance between the bottom of the pubic bones and the rear tip of the keel bone, in addition to a wide distance between the pubic bones, means good abdominal capacity and is desirable.

If a pair of hens has equal bleaching, handling quality and abdominal capacity, then use molt condition to decide which hen is best. A hen that is not molting (losing and replacing feathers) or that has molted the fewest primary feathers is desirable.

If possible, place the class based on loss of pigment (bleaching) from the skin. It is assumed that the more bleached a hen has become, the more eggs she has laid. Compare the amount of pigment in the skin of the four hens. The hen that has the least pigment should be placed first, and so forth according to the amount of pigmentation.

Certain characteristics are used to estimate the number of eggs each hen has laid. The hens are ranked with the top hen being the one estimated to have laid the most eggs. The judging will be done by comparison, that is, comparing each hen to the others in the class.  The hens may be individually removed from their cages for inspection. When a contestant has completed the evaluation of a hen, the hen is to be returned to her cage, not to another contestant. The hens should be handled gently at all times.

Bleaching of Past Production Hens

The most important factor in determining past egg production is the loss of pigment from the skin and shanks of the bird. Leghorn hybrids used for egg production have yellow-pigmented skin and shanks. This pigment is deposited in the skin, beak, shanks and feet while the bird is a growing pullet. At sexual maturity, which is 16-22 weeks of age, she starts to lay eggs.  The pigment then bleaches from the pigmented areas in a definite order according to the approximate number of eggs she has laid. If you learn the order of pigment loss or bleaching, you can easily rank the hens
for past egg production. The order is:
  1. vent,
  2. eye ring,
  3. ear lobe
  4. beak (corner of the mouth toward the tip),
  5. bottom of the foot.
  6. pigment loss over the entire shank
                (front, back and sides).
SKIN ZONE CUMULATIVE EGGS

LAID

ELAPSED

TIME

VENT 0-10

0-2 Weeks
EYE RING 8-12

2.0-2.5 Weeks
EAR LOBE 10-15

2.5-3.0 Weeks
BEAK 35

5-8 Weeks
BOTTOM OF FEET 68

TOTAL SHANKS 159

TOP OF TOES & HOCKS 175-180

20-30 Weeks

Hens regain their pigment when they stop production. The pigment returns to the skin in the same order it is bleached; vent, eye ring, ear lobe, beak, bottom of the foot, shank, hock and toes. Hens that show signs of re-pigmentation are poor producers.

B. Oral Reasons for Past Egg Production


Objectives:

To present the reasons the class of hens was placed in a particular order (ranked).

Guidelines:

Ten minutes will be provided to prepare oral reasons on one of the past production classes. Two minutes will be allowed to present the oral reasons. The contestants may be asked questions about their oral reasons or the class of hens.  Each pair should be compared together, and an explanation given for placing one bird above the other. (That is, discuss the top pair, middle pair and bottom pair.)

Getting Started, Make a Note Sheet

Let's learn about judging hens for past production by looking at some birds. First, prepare to take notes on each bird as you study her past production characteristics. Get a clipboard and make a form like the one below:

NOTES

Months of Production

Bird #

Pigment Loss
(P)

Handling Qualities
(HQ)

Abdominal Capacity
(AC)

Molt
(M)

1

2

3

4

Placing

Junior Division contestants may use notes when presenting reasons. Senior Division contestants may not use notes.

C. Grading Ready-to-Cook Chickens


Objective:

To assign a grade (A, B, or C) for the quality of each of 10 ready-to-cook chicken carcasses.

Guidelines:

  1. Broiler carcasses weighing between 2.0 and 5.0 pounds will be used.
  2. Carcasses will be suspended from shackles or placed on trays.

.Criteria such as conformation, fleshing, fat covering, discolorations, and the presence of feathers will be ignored.

Table 1 summarizes the specifications for exposed flesh, disjointed and broken bones, and missing parts. Note that a IA inch of exposed flesh on breast and legs is now allowed for Grade A.

The location of disjointed bones may be the shoulder, elbow, hip or knee.

Note the footnote for Table 1. A carcass is defined as having six parts: two wings, two legs, back and breast. Thus, each leg includes a drumstick and thigh. "Elsewhere" means the back and two wings

Shackles may be handled; however, touching of a carcass may result in disqualification.

Only the factors of exposed flesh, disjointed and broken bones, and missing parts will be used from the USDA standards for determining the quality of ready-to-cook

The location of broken bones may be the tibia (drumstick), humerus, or radius-ulna. The radius and ulna are the two bones between the wing tip and humerus. Even if both the radius and ulna are broken on one wing, USDA only counts it as one broken bone.

Processing (eviscerating) cuts may sometimes result in some flesh being exposed on the tip of the breast or on the thigh near the tail. As a result of extensions of the evisceration cuts, Grade A carcasses can have about 1½ inches of the tip of the breast exposed and about 1 inch of each thigh exposed. If more flesh is exposed than about 1/2 inches of the tip of the breast or about 1 inch of either thigh, but no more than one-third of the flesh exposed on the breast or on either thigh, then the carcass would be a Grade B.

Other criteria such as conformation, fleshing, fat covering, discolorations, and the presence of feathers will be ignored.  The location of disjointed bones may be the shoulder, elbow, hip or knee.

Protruding bones may be broken or unbroken.  Any protruding bone makes the carcass a Grade C.

Table 1 summarizes the specifications for exposed flesh, disjointed and broken bones, and missing parts. Note that a 1/4 inch of exposed flesh on breast and legs is now allowed in the 4-H contests and under USDAclassifications for Grade A.

 Summary of Poultry Judging Contest Specifications of Quality for Individual Carcasses of Ready-to-Cook Poultry

Factor

A Quality

B Quality

C Quality

Exposed Flesh
Carcass Weight

Minimum             Maximum
None                  2 lb
Over 2 lbs           6 lbs
Over 6 lbs           16 lbs
Over 16 lbs         None

Breast2 Else- Else- Else- Else-2
   & where where where where
LegsParts Carcass
¼" 1/2 " 1"
¼" 3/4" I 1/2"
½" 1" 2"

½" 1 1/2" 3"

Parts &

Carcass:

1/3 of flesh exposed on each part of carcass provided meat yield not appreciably affected

No Limit

Disjointed bones

1 disjointed

2 disjointed

          or

1 disjointed and

1 nonprotruding broken
          or

1 nonprotruding broken

No Limit

Broken bones

None

No Limit

any protruding broken bones

Missing parts

Wing tips and/or tail removed at the base

Wing(s) to 2nd joint.

Back area not wider than base of tail and extending less than halfway between base of tail and hip joints.

Entire wing(s).

Back area not wider than base of tail extending to area beyond halfway to hip joints.

1Longest length for a cut and total area for tears and missing skin based on the whole part.

2For purposes of definition tile parts of the carcass shall be each wing, leg, entire breast and entire back.

Maximum aggregate area of exposed flesh on each part.
2 A Grade A carcass may have cuts or tears that do not expand or significantly expose flesh, provided the total aggregate
length does not exceed ¼" on the breast or either leg and 1Y2" on the back or either wing.
a "Elsewhere" means the back and two wings.
4 The parts of the carcass shall be each wing, each leg (drumstick and thigh connected), entire back, and entire breast with
each permitted to have one-third of the flesh exposed by cuts, team, and missing skin.

D.         Identification of Chicken Carcass Parts


Objective: To identify carcass parts.

Guidelines:

  • Only chicken carcass parts will be used.

  • A part may appear more than once. For example, two wings might be used.

  • Parts can be displayed in any position.

  • The parts must not be touched. Touching a part may result in disqualification.

..

Listing and Description of Parts for Identification

Identifying common poultry parts found in a retail store is important to the consumer. Prepackaging has allowed poultry to be sold in many forms. The consumer should know the parts of the carcass that are usually prepackaged for sale in the meat counter.

Whole breast--Intact bream separated from the re­minder of the chicken at the Junction of the vertebral and sternal ribs. The sternal ribs remain attached to the breast one and the vertebral ribs remain attached to the back. May be displayed with skin side up or skin side down.

Breast with ribs--Intact breast separated from the backbone at the juncture of the vertebral ribs and back. The entire rib cage is attached to the breast. May be displayed with skin side up or skin side down.

Breast without ribs--Intact breast separated from the backbone at the juncture of the shoulder joint and then downward cutting through the juncture of the vertebral ribs and the sternal ribs. The entire rib cage is attached to the breast. May be displayed with skin side up or skin side down. (FFA)

Wishbone--(with its muscle and skin covering)  Is severed from the breast approximately half way between the end of the (hypocledium) and from the point of the breastbone (cranial process of the sternal crest) to a point where the wishbone joins the shoulder .(FFA)

Breast quarter--Half of the breast with the wing and back portion attached.

Breast quarter without Wing--Breast quarter with the wing removed. (FFA)

Spilt breast--Breast with ribs cut in half parallel to breast bone to approximately two equal halved One or both halves may be displayed.

Boneless whole breast--Whole breast with bones removed. Skin can be attached or removed (Boneless Skinless Whole Breast - FFA).

Boneless skinless breast--Half breast with bones and skin removed. (FFA)

Breast tenderloin--lnner pectoral muscle that lies up against the keel bone. It is the long slender muscle that is removed from the Inner portion of the breast meat.

Whole leg--Thigh and drumstick attached with back portion removed. The oyster can be attached. The oyster is the piece of meat on the back that lies just In front of the hip Joint.

Leg quarter--Thigh and drumstick with a portion of the back attached.

Thigh--Is the upper portion of the whole leg that is separated at the knee and hip joint.

Skinless Boneless Thigh--Consists of the thigh portion disjointed at the hip.  May include the pelvic meat.  All bone, cartilage, gristle, and skin removed. (FFA)

Boneless thigh--Whole thigh with bone removed. Skin may or may not be attached.

Thigh with Back--Whole thigh with back portion from leg quarter still attached. (FFA)

Drumstick--Is the lower portion of the leg that is separated at the knee and hock joint.

Wings--Entire wing with all muscle, bone and skin attached except that the wing tip, or portion of the wing tip, may be removed.

GIblets--Heart, gizzard and liver--Can display all or one in contest.

Neck--The neck bones -with flesh attached. The skin may or may not be present.

Back--The beck of the carcass beginning at the bale of the neck and extending backward to the till. It Includes the vertebral rlbs, hip bones an attached flesh. Ail or portions of the oyster may also be attached.

Drumette--Consists of the humerus (first portion) of a wing with adhering skin and meat.

Flat or wing mid-joint flat-- Consists of the radius and ulna (second portion of the wing), with the meat and adhering skin attached.

E. Interior Egg Quality: Candled Eggs


Objective: To assign a grade (AA, A, B, or Inedible) for the interior quality of each of 10 eggs.

No loose, bubbly or out-of-position air cells will be used intentionally. If a contestant finds such an air cell then the condition should be ignored in the grading of interior quality. Also, exterior stains or dirt and faulty eggshell shape or texture will not be considered as factors which influence the interior quality.

Guidelines:

Contestants will individually candle and grade 20 eggs. Correct candling technique should be taught by the coaches. Any contestant that shakes an egg "violently" in order to facilitate internal content movement may be disqualified.

The depth of the air cell will be the primary factor in determining the grade of an egg. Ordinarily, the smaller the air cell the higher the interior egg quality. The yolk shadow will be a secondary factor. A prominent shadow or outline indicates that the albumen is not very dense so the yolk is not held near the center of the egg and has a dark shadow when it is near the shell. A faint shadow or outline indicates dense albumen that holds the yolk near the center of the egg. High quality eggs have dense albumen.

Eggs with blood or meat spots aggregating more than 1/8 inch in diameter will be classified as Inedible. Eggs with very small spots aggregating not more than 1/a inch diameter will not be intentionally used. The contestant should not confuse blood spots with the normally occurring chalaza. This "string" of albumen serves to help hold the yolk in the center of the egg and may be prominent in some eggs. The chalaza is usually distinguished from a blood spot by a bright area of refracted light that accompanies the darker shadow of the chalaza.

F.   Interior Egg Quality: Broken-Out Eggs assign a grade (AA, A, B, or Inedible) for the interior quality of each of 10 eggs.

Objective: To assign a grade (AA, A, B, or Inedible) for the interior quality of each of 10 eggs.

Guidelines: Stained eggs are either Grade B or Dirty, depending on the characteristics of the stained portion. (An exception is that Grade A eggs may have very slight stains.) Stains vary by intensity, size and type.

Intensity: approximate definitions

G. Carton eggs written factors and placing (FFA)

Four one dozen cartons of eggs will be evaluated and scored and placed based on consumer appeal, uniformity and grading factors.  The shells will be white or white-tent in color.  Evaluation will be based on soundness, cleanness, and uniformity of the visible portions of the shell.  Exterior or shell grading factors will be used to evaluate the cartons for factors.  Defects are evaluated as Minor (certain Grade B exterior factors), Major (other Grade B factors) and Critical (checks, cracks, and dirty to include prominent stains.

  • Minor Factors Irregular shape, calcium deposits, definite ridges, and slight stain.
  • Major Factors    Body check, mixed color, uneven size.
  • Critical Factors  Checked, cracked, adhering material, or prominent stain.

I. Evaluation Precooked, Breaded Chicken Patties:

The meat portion of a patty contains chicken breast meat and natural proportion skin that is chopped or ground and formed by machine. In placing the breaded chicken patties each patty will be represented by a cross-section of the patty, with its interior and exterior portions exposed for viewing. Patty quality is evaluated using the factors below.

  • Batter/Breading Texture: Thickness and adhesiveness of external coating on the meat. Ideal is coverage should be essentially 100% of the surface area with uniform texture over the entire area.
  • Meat Color: The color of the internal meat patty. Ideal is cooked white meat lacking in pink tone.
  • Meat Texture: Uniformity of meat in the patty. Ideal is little or no void areas in the meat; no missing meat.
  • Batter/Breading Color: Color of the external coating (breading on the meat. Ideal is golden brown, uniform color over entire surface area of the patty.
  • Shape/Size/Completeness: How closely the patty meets the "specified" shape. Ideal is generally flat with relatively clean, sharp edges; uniform thickness consistent with the forming plate.
  • Foreign Material: Non-food or un palatable items in the breading and or meat. Ideal is no foreign material present.

J. Exterior Egg Quality

  1. Slight: easily visible from 1 foot but difficult to see from about 3 feet. (Grade B)
  2. Moderate: easily visible from 3 feet but difficult to see from about 6 feet. (Grade B Or Dirty)
  3. Prominent: easily visible from 6 feet.

(Dirty)

Objective: To assign a grade (A, B or Dirty) for the exterior quality of each of 20 eggs.

Guidelines:

  1. Each egg will be laid horizontally on a flat and decisions will be based only on the visible portion. Size: Candling is one of the methods used to evaluate the interior quality of an egg. Knowledge of the parts of the egg is helpful for understanding candling and grading During training, 1/32 and 1/16 of the shell surface of an egg should be marked off so contestants can become familiar with those areas. The size of the stained portion must be mentally added and the total area compared to that allowed.
  2. The eggs must not be touched. Touching an egg may result in disqualification. The broken-out eggs will be placed on the bottom of white plastic plates turned upside down (about 8-inch diameter plates).
  3. The USDA standards for exterior quality of eggs will be used, as interpreted below.
    1. Localized: a single stain (all stained area is connected) A single standard is used for Grade AA and Grade A; it is referred to as Grade A. (In the poultry industry, eggs that are Grade A for exterior quality are eligible to be sold as Grade AA or Grade A depending on the interior quality. While eggs that are Grade B for exterior quality are only eligible to be sold as Grade B even if the interior quality is Grade AA or A, that is, the lowest grade for either interior or exterior becomes the overall grade for an egg.)
    2. Scattered: two or more separate stained areas.Body-checked eggs may; (a) have fracture lines which are visible to the naked eye, or (b) have ridges or bulges associated with the area of shell which was fractured during calcification but the fracture lines are not visible unless candled. If the fracture lines are visible to the naked eye, then the egg is a Grade B. If the lines are not visible to the naked eye, then the size of the ridges or bulges must be considered regarding egg shape in order to determine the grade of the egg.  When possible, eggs will not be used if they have cage marks, thin spots or "windows" (translucent areas), since these conditions are somewhat confusing to grade.egg shape, extent of ridges/bulges and shell texture or thickness.

The grade assigned to an egg is that of the lowest grade on the six factors (stains, dirt, shape, texture, ridges, thickness). Therefore, defects in the factor are not added but are considered separately.

K. Exterior Egg Quality Grades

Table 2 summarizes the descriptive terminology used in the USDA Egg Grading Manual to help deter­mine the grade of an egg by exterior quality. For 4-H Poultry Judging Contests, eggs will be assigned the grades of A, B and Dirty. Grades AA and A have identical standards. The factors that affect exterior quality are discussed below.

Table 2. Summary of Standards for Exterior Quality Eggs

Factor

Grade

AA or A

B

Dirty

Stain Clean-may show small specks, stains or cage marks that do not detract from general clean appearance of the egg--may show traces of processing oil. Slight, or moderate localized stains less than 1/32 of shell or scattered stains less than 1/16 of shell. Prominent stains. Moderate stains covering more than 1/32 if localized and 1/16 of the shell if scattered.
Adhering Dirt or Foreign Material NONE

NONE

Adhering dirt or foreign material (1.0 mm in area or greater)
Egg Shape Approximately the usual shape, Unusual or decidedly misshapen (very long or distorted).
Shell Texture May have rough areas and small calcium deposits that do not materially affect shape or strength, Extremely rough areas that may be faulty in soundness or strength. May have large calcium deposits.
Ridges Slight ridges that do not materially affect shape or strength. May have pronounced ridges.
Shell Thickness Free from thin spots. May show pronounced thin spots.
Body Checks Absence for body checks May show pronounced body checks

Stains

Grade A eggs must be clean.  These eggs can show traces of processing oil (used to preserve freshness).  This processing oil may give a shiny or opaque appearance.  Eggs with slight stains, or moderate stains covering less than 1/32 of the shell, if the stain occurs in one localized area, or 1/16 of the shell surface, if the stains are scattered, are assigned Grade B.

Dirty eggs have prominent stains, or moderate stains covering more than 1/32 of the shell if localized, and 1/16 of the shell if scattered.  Eggs with adhering dirt or foreign material are also classifeied as dirty.

Evaluate only what you see.

Adhering Dirt or Foreign Material

Grade A and B eggs cannot have any adhering dirt or foreign material. Eggs with adhering material (3-dimensional) larger than a speck (about 1.0 mm) should be classified as Dirty. Small specks of dust or lint that may have settled out of the air should not be considered.

Egg Shape

There is a considerable range of egg shapes that could be considered."approximately the usual shape" or Grade A. Eggs that are perfectly spherical (round) or too long to fit in the egg carton should be graded B quality. B quality grade for egg shape will include eggs that are clearly misshapen or that have definite flat areas.

Shell Texture

Eggs with faulty texture are much weaker in shell strength and may be broken during distribution. Shells with large calcium deposits (greater than 1/s inch in diameter) should be classified as Grade B. Eggs with small calcium deposits are classified as Grade A. There is no standard for number of calcium deposits which means that small calcium deposits over the entire shell may be classified as Grade A if otherwise qualified. A good rule of thumb is that if you were to pull your fingernail across a calcium deposit, and there would be a good size hole if it came off, it would be classified as Grade B.

Ridges

Ridges can result in weakened shells. Many eggs show small ridges and most of these should be classi­fied as Grade A. Those eggs with large ridges are Grade B.

Shell Thickness

The shell should appear thick enough to withstand reasonable handling without breaking. Grade A eggs must have thick shells with no thin spots. Thin shells or thin spots would place an egg in Grade B. In all cases the shell must not be broken.

Body Checks

Body checks can result in weakened shells. Body checks are eggs which look like the shell was cracked but still has an intact shell. Body checks are eggs which are cracked when the shell is being formed in the hen's body and partially repaired before being laid.

Contestants tend to be too critical in their evaluation of exterior quality, often classifying eggs in lower grades than do the official judges.

l. Oral reason Ready to Cook Turkey or Broiler carcasses (FFA)

M. Written Management Exam (FFA)

4-H Rules and regulations

  1. All contestants must be bonafide 4-H Club members.
  2. There will be two judging divisions:
    1. Senior Division - Contestants must be 14 years old on or before September 1 and must not have graduated or passed their 19th birthday on or before September 1 of the current year. A contestant can not have competed at the National Poultry Judging Event. A team will consist of three or four members. Only the total scores of the three highest-scoring members will be used for team awards. (A county is allowed to have only one Senior Team.) The top 4 eligible individuals at the state 4-H contest will be eligible for the State Team.
    2. Junior Division - Contestants must be 8-13 years old as of September 1 of the current year. A team will consist of three or four members. Only the total scores of the three highest-scoring members will be used for team awards.
  3. The National Poultry and Egg Conference Rules

    The National Poultry and Egg Conference rules have been changed to allow each state to enter a senior team and a senior individual (not a member of the winning team). All contestants (team members plus individuals) will participate in the National Judging Event at the same time. The individuals will compete for the various individual awards. As a result of this rule change, senior individuals can now have the opportunity to compete at the National Event even if their county team did not win the State Event or if their county did not have a team.  As in the past, counties can have individual contestants at the State Poultry Judging Event (even if the county does not have a team) and the counties are encouraged to do so.

    The procedure for selecting the senior individual to participate at the National Poultry Judging Event will be as follows: All senior contestants, team members and individuals, will be in the Senior Division. The total scores will be ranked and the names of the winning team members eliminated (because they will be going to the National Event. Then the top-ranked remaining senior contestant, team member or individual, will be eligible to go to the National Event and compete as an individual. If that person decides not to go, then the opportunity will be offered to the next ranked contestant, and so forth. It will be the individual contestant's responsibility to provide for her/his expenses to participate in the National Judging Event (as it is for the 4-H Miscellaneous Events category), however, the Extension Poultry Youth Specialist will try to facilitate participation.

  4. Classes will be the same for both divisions.

  5. Senior team goes to National Event

    The first place Senior team will receive partial support of travel to Louisville, KY in November where they will represent Missouri at the National 4-H Poultry Judging Event. There is no Junior Event beyond the State level for the first place individual.